by Greta G. Carroll


It was some years ago, while living in Surrey (Canada), that I first saw spacecraft. Although many others have been seen since and of different types (perhaps from different planets?), these remain in memory as the most remarkable. They were the nearest, stayed longest, and apparently enjoyed giving a marvelously unforgettable display of the ease, energy and maneuverability of their ships.

I had come out from New Westminster on the Sunbury bus around eight o'clock one evening in late summer and alighted at the junction of Scott and River Roads. Some eight or ten other persons got off, too, and began plodding up Scott Hill with heavy shopping bags. The roadside is narrow there and it is a busy corner, so I waited for the bus to go on that I might have a clear view and safe room for walking. My back was turned to the bus and I was facing over the flats toward New Westminster, a lovely view in itself, when I gasped - unmistakably three space ships were hovering near the hollow part of a crescent formed by second-growth evergreen forest along the upper end of the flat! Just beyond lay the Fraser river with New Westminster terraced along its course.

The three ships were alike in shape, being round, and of a metallic light beige-grey colour, and their rims gave me the impression of a silvery chrome trimming band on the outside edge and another inside near the rounded, but flattish, dome. This may have been due to their great speed and the sunset light. They seemed the size of large dinner plates and must have been a mile away. One of them was definitely larger and apparently, the leader. The other two stayed rather close together with the second usually a little in advance. The third one, as I remember, did not move much and did only a little flying. No landing gear was noticed.

The lead craft was very active. Immediately I saw them, suspended in the air and on a level, it took off with orange-blue-yellow flame streaking at the rear for some feet. With a skill and joyful abandon that was astonishing and almost incredible, it skimmed along opposite New Westminster, became invisible, and appeared again far over in the direction of Whalley, some miles away, almost instantly. Then, with a swerving turn, it as freely glided back and, again, at full speed, became invisible. It did this many times, now and then going high enough, and near enough, to look over New Westminster. It would appear back above the far hills so quickly that I had to turn my head before it started back. Very plainly it was guided by a being of superior intelligence and quite as plainly, was far in advance of earth's aircraft.

The second ship flew shorter distances fairly frequently, and the whole "route" with the lead craft repeatedly. On the shorter trips it slipped back to its place in reverse motion, as a humming of coloured light followed as it started. The third ship was stationary most of the time. The actions of these ships conveyed a definite attitude to the beholder. They seemed writing in the sky the message that they had many times reconnoitered this city, knew all about it, and its inhabitants. That the ships themselves were at peace with everyone and much of the joyousness of their flights was due to this and the intelligent love they had for people. Their great freedom of action, swiftness and power was exhibited in a way that conveyed intuitively the information that the city below was absolutely in their power, but quite safe for all that.

I watched them for ten minutes, perhaps more, turning around several times to see if any of the other passengers, then part way up Scott Hill, had turned around and caught sight of them. All, however, remained headed homewards. Passing cars seemed not to see them either. I then walked up Chickadee lane toward home, turning to watch them several times, and seeing the lead craft appear in the direction of Whalley ahead of me and to the left.

At the curve of the lane, I went into the house of a neighbour opposite ours, a widow who lives alone, and called her out to look at them. Her front porch is high and has a clear view over a wide area. "What are they?" she cried in astonishment. "Flying saucers," I answered, "they couldn't be anything else!" We watched their swift, skimming flights and returns for about fifteen minutes. Then I went over home and called my husband from the tree-bordered garden in the backyard to see them. We both watched for twenty minutes in awe and wonder, love and understanding. Then he returned to the garden to finish chores and I went into the house. Dusk was coming on, and I did not look out again. How much longer they remained I do not know.

I can never understand why, next morning, when I told some neighbours we had seen them, they had not noticed them at all. Or why nothing appeared in our local newspaper. Perhaps the space craft cannot be seen by everyone, was my tentative conclusion. Subsequent sightings seem to bear this out. Why they appeared to us three I cannot understand either.

The exact date of this experience I did not set down and do not remember. But it was probably 1947. Having studied Oahspe for fifteen years, they were not unexpected, and I said, "Well, they're here now!" expecting they would be around frequently in future as a common experience for everyone. Had I known, then, all the mystery, repression and confusion governments were going to give the matter of space ships, I would have reported them to the newspapers myself. That was nearly ten ago and people are still kept in ignorance with many unconvinced.